Blank Page Anxieties

These people ought to know who we are and tell that we are here

Posts tagged william shakespeare

2 notes

A page from the last issue of The Sandman, which can be found in the last volume The Wake. Worlds by Neil Gaiman, artwork by Charles Vess. I’ve been rereading bits and pieces of the series, and this page struck me for a few reasons.
I went through a pretty rough break up a little over a year ago, and it’s taken a while for me to regain my footing. It was a hard experience to go through, but I get where Shakespeare is coming from here, as a storyteller it gives you material to work with, real material that you know is true. It’s both horrid and wonderful at the same time, something that I think Gaiman is trying to get at with the duplicitous nature of storytelling. It has the capacity to be both true and false, honest and dishonest, at the same time.
Beyond that, there’s some amazing visual storytelling here. The first panel where Shakespeare stands between Despair and Delirium’s windows, which transitions to the second panel where Despair’s window engulfs the background (makes sense since Will has a serious case of the blues). And then the first panel of the bottom row, where Dream stands in front of Death’s window. It’s a bit of foreshadowing for both characters, or in Morpheus’ case… post-shadowing? Is that even a thing?
Anyway, just some thoughts. I like talking about comics, I wish I did it more.

A page from the last issue of The Sandman, which can be found in the last volume The Wake. Worlds by Neil Gaiman, artwork by Charles Vess. I’ve been rereading bits and pieces of the series, and this page struck me for a few reasons.

I went through a pretty rough break up a little over a year ago, and it’s taken a while for me to regain my footing. It was a hard experience to go through, but I get where Shakespeare is coming from here, as a storyteller it gives you material to work with, real material that you know is true. It’s both horrid and wonderful at the same time, something that I think Gaiman is trying to get at with the duplicitous nature of storytelling. It has the capacity to be both true and false, honest and dishonest, at the same time.

Beyond that, there’s some amazing visual storytelling here. The first panel where Shakespeare stands between Despair and Delirium’s windows, which transitions to the second panel where Despair’s window engulfs the background (makes sense since Will has a serious case of the blues). And then the first panel of the bottom row, where Dream stands in front of Death’s window. It’s a bit of foreshadowing for both characters, or in Morpheus’ case… post-shadowing? Is that even a thing?

Anyway, just some thoughts. I like talking about comics, I wish I did it more.

Filed under the sandman the wake dream William Shakespeare neil gaiman charles vess comics